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Business portrait

If I as a photographer can let my clients chose from more different portraits with more different backgrounds and styles, chances are big that they will buy more.

That has been my sales pitch the last few years, and it works. The more choices I give to my clients, the more portraits they will buy. And the best part is that they will pay me more money but at the same time they will be more satisfied.

Truth be told, if you are in need of a professional portrait, two or three will be a lot more useful than just one. In the long run, at least. Why buy just one carton of milk when you have walked all the way to the store? Especially if you could use two in a near future.

Four lights, two channels and a happy client…

Portrait-of-a-CEO-on-a-gocart-Two-Profoto-B1-Deep-Umbrella-diffusion

Recently I was hired to shoot portraits for an annual report. They wanted me to visit their clients and have good photos from their business. This example is from an in-door amusement park, and their CEO.

We walked around the place and took portraits here and there, and finally we got to the go-karts. The Art Director wanted photos with a lot of copy space so they could place text on top of the portrait, so I arranged this in front of a black wall.

More lighting, less retouch…

Portrait with hair light

I often use light from behind to act as rim light in my studio portraits, and might even call that light hair light if it lights the hair. But that is not entirely correct, I think. “Real” hair light should be focused on the hair more, from higher up.

This portrait, or headshot, I took of a woman wanting a good profile picture for her CV and online services such as LinkedIn is a good example of how a hair light can make the ordinary lighting look a little bit more glamourous.

Two light, a grid and a DIY reflector…

Single-Portrait-Photo-lit-with-two-Profoto-Umbrella-XL-and-Front-Diffuser

Recently I bought two Profoto Umbrella XL (silver) with the optional Front Diffuser, they are really big and gives a soft light (of course, as they are quite big light sources) but with contrast. Maybe not the light modifier I would use primarily for portraits in the studio (I have tried it, and it is ok, but not great), my 5-foot softbox Octa is still more my choice there, but for assignments on locations they are very good. And they are easy to carry, and easy to set up.

I was hired to take publicity photos from an event a client of mine had which included a prize ceremony and they needed good photos of the winners. That included single portraits of the winners as well as group photos in different sizes.

What made me very glad was that with just two umbrellas (big ones, but still just umbrellas) I could use the exact same lighting setup as well as light settings and exposure to get good portraits and good group shots.

Two umbrellas for portraits and group shots…

Business portrait setup using three lights

This is a business portrait from the final session the day I used almost the same lighting setup for three different clients with just the addition of one more light for every new “model”.

It started with the one light setup with a test model (a friend with a skate board), which resulted in these portraits of a Swedish singer.

Later the same day, I shot some business portraits using two lights, and last, the portrait above with a third light used as fill light. Just a little, to make the texture in his face become more visible, and the shadows more open.

Lighting setup diagram and behind the scenes here…